In this post I’m sharing a research project I completed a couple of months ago, regarding migration policy in India. I wanted to share this report because, in the developed world, we often feel like we’re having numerous problems with migration which can sometimes drive us insane. But we mustn’t forget the even bigger issues that people in the developing world face. This realisation hopefully helps to ground us and remind us of our more privileged position.

India Policy Reform Report

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8 thoughts on “Policy Reform in India

  1. The story of poorly educated, overpopulated nations inability to apply any measure of control against the worst population epidemic in the history of our species. The region of the world you’ve described is the most densely populated space on the entire planet, and government inability to control or reign in this situation shouldn’t come as any surprise 😳

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The reason I posted this isn’t become it came as a surprise to me, it’s more because I don’t want people to forget that some countries are forced into much more difficult conditions than we think we’re in. Thanks for your comment anyway!

      Liked by 2 people

  2. I continue to be impressed by your fearlessness in sharing your thoughts. In my United States, under the Trump Administration (of which I am no fan), the immigration (legal AND illegal) is a fraught issue. And as I write my book, and I think more about how both of my grandfathers fled to the United States from Russia as children in the wake of late-19th/early-20th-century pogroms, it becomes even more personal for me. It is not always obvious where the balance is between allowing in waves of unskilled workers seeking better opportunities (my grandfathers came here speaking only Yiddish, then experienced great success, each in their own way) and attracting skilled workers to improve your economy. Or where the balance between border security and “give me your tired, your poor…” is. I have no answers, though I tend to come down on the side of “the more, the merrier,” even at the potential expense of national security.

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  3. Enjoyed reading your report. I was partially aware of many of the issues you raised, specifically of the shortage of judges- there was an excellent article about that in the Wall Street Journal a couple of weeks ago. India is the world’s largest democracy, success for democracy there equals success for humanity as a whole.
    In regard to the immigration question, I have seen migrant streams in Afghanistan. If you haven’t seen such a situation with your own eyes, you wouldn’t believe it. Unbelievable poverty, misery and exploitation. Many of the voices that are heard here in the US have no idea what they are talking about, they have not experienced or seen such depths of despair.
    Re: stricter control of border guards. I wonder if perhaps the guards should be paid more, in addition to heaver penalties for malfeasance.
    Finally, there can be no question that immigration from India in the US has been wholly beneficial. Anyone who claims otherwise is being willfully disingenuous. I don’t live in an urban area, this is not an immigration hotspot. However, I have weekly, if not daily, interactions with people of Indian descent. They are an integral part of local society. LOL, if you would go back in the family trees of nearly every American you will find immigrants from all corners of the globe. I don’t have to think hard at all to identify a dozen family members who came from elsewhere in the last hundred years. India and the United States are, and should be, linked together. Success for one means success for the other.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You’re absolutely correct when you mention the fact that ‘if you haven’t seen such a situation with you own eyes, you wouldn’t believe it’. I’ve spent 2 years living in India, which is in a similar situation to Afghanistan, and the adversity which so much of the population faces is unimaginable. Homelessness in the western world doesn’t even compare to what millions of Indians, as well as citizens of other South-Asian countries, face every day. It’s deeply saddening.

      Anyway, I’ll probably write a separate post about this topic because a lot of people don’t know the true extent of the situation. Also, thanks for showing your support and sharing your thoughts which I completely agree with.

      Like

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